Adulting Skills — Get Organized RSS


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Get Organized: Color Coding is Brain Candy

Color coding is like "brain candy" for people with attention and focus issues because it taps into the brain's attraction to visual stimuli, offering a simple yet effective way to organize information, stay focused, and manage tasks. How information is organized and presented profoundly affects our brain’s ability to process that information. It can affect how quickly we can understand the information or how well we can remember it. Take these two lists as an example, which list would help you structure your time better? To Do's: Email family about party Unload the dishwasher make dinner fold laundry pack tomorrow's lunches lay out kids clothes Check tomorrow's schedule Load and start dishwasher To Do's: Email family about party Unload the dishwasher...

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Get Organized: See the Future

Plan for the long term. When you need to tackle a large project or have a big goal you want to accomplish, it can be helpful to understand the difference between a macro-view and a micro-view of the tasks involved. What must get done now? And what can wait? Understanding macro and micro can help us prioritize when there’s too much to be done at one time. Macro-level thinking is long-term and big goal-focused: completing a year of school, renovating a room, and completing a large work project. These things take focus on the long-term.  Micro-level thinking is the small steps that build a foundation towards the bigger goal. These close-up, detailed views are important because they help you make...

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Get Organized: Brain Dumping Method

This technique is useful when you have a lot of thoughts rolling through your mind. It is the act of writing down everything that comes to your mind. This is a way to get your thoughts out of your brain, onto paper, and free up space in your mind. This is done without self-criticism, self-editing, or trying to cut anything short. All thoughts and ideas are welcome during brain dumping. How to do a brain dump Find a blank space to write - it can be scratch paper, somewhere in your planner, or a note on your phone. Write down everything that comes to mind. It doesn't have to be orderly, just get it out of your head and onto paper....

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Get Organized: Help Them Help You

Accountability means taking responsibility for your own stuff. If you find yourself saying: “I didn’t know,” “No one made me a list,” or “No one told me what to do.” Then you aren’t being accountable for your own responsibilities. Yet sometimes, we do need someone else’s assistance. Accountability partners can help you reduce stress and pain, allowing you to refocus on the task. Accountability partners can be a friend, a colleague, a co-worker, a family member — someone who is interested in you as a person and wants you to do well. This person isn’t going to help you do the work, answer your questions about the work, or get mad if you don’t get things done. Instead, this is...

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Get Organized: Stop Relying on Working Memory

Lists! (Stop relying on your working memory!) Working memory is the part of your brain focused on immediate tasks, steps, to-dos, and conversations (ie: choosing your words carefully). But when you use your working memory for too many tasks and challenges, it causes cognitive fatigue. If you struggle with paying attention, remaining focused, and task completion -- you need to learn to use external tricks instead of relying on your brain to hold a million details.  This is where lists come in handy; when you are trying to get a lot of things done, lists can feel like a waste of time or the best idea ever. Understanding what they are good for will help you decide when to use...

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